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BA (Hons) International Business Management

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The course is aimed at students wishing to pursue a career in the arena of international business management and who would like to gain a competitive edge in today’s global job market. The course provides students with all-round knowledge and skills in international business management and cross-cultural management.

Beacon International College and its partner reserve the rights, at its discretion, to change, modify, add or remove the course information at any time without prior notice. Please check the course information periodically for changes.

Introduction

The principal aims of the programme are to:

  • Enable students to develop a critical understanding of the main functional areas of business and management within a variety of national and international organisational contexts.
  • Produce a graduate with the necessary subject knowledge, practical skills and intercultural competencies to make an effective contribution to an organisation and work effectively in culturally diverse teams.
  • Develop in students a critical appreciation of the complex nature of management practice and the roles managers undertake in the modern business world.
  • Enable students to develop analytical and evidence-based approach that commensurate with degree level higher education and lay the foundation for future and continuing professional development.
  • Develop intercultural awareness of cultural differences and how these impact on business.
Course Content

The BA (Hons) International Business Management is a 360-credit qualification that consists of core modules and optional modules determined by the college that provide for a combined total of 360 credits.

Year 1

Students follow 120 credits of core modules.

Core Modules
  • Part A: Student led content
    Drawing on pre-induction/induction tasks, this module will explore themes, issues and debates identified by students. These themes, issues and debates will focus on current and contemporary issues.

    Part B: The Business Context
    The Business Context will involve looking in-depth at a range of contemporary issues and debates which illustrate, build upon and extend those identified in Part A. Students will be shown through such context:

    • Systems and complexity
    • The conceptual dimensions of the business environment
    • The functional nature of business activity
    • The tools and techniques necessary for the effective analysis of business information and data.

    Such issues in this section might include the following examples:

    • Global warming and business sustainability
    • Happiness and its management
    • The global food industry: what are you eating?
    • Technology and its impacts

    An analysis of these issues will consider in combination a number of the following dimensions

    • markets – the development and operation of markets for resources, goods and services
    • customers – customer expectations, service and orientation
    • finance – the sources, uses and management of finance; the use of accounting and other information systems for managerial applications
    • people – the management and development of people within organisations
    • operations – the management of resources and operations
    • information systems – the development, management and exploitation of information systems and their impact upon organisations
    • communication and information technology – the comprehension and use of relevant communication and information technologies for application in business and management
    • business policy and strategy – the development of appropriate policies and strategies within a changing environment, to meet stakeholder interests
    • pervasive issues – sustainability, globalisation, corporate social responsibility, diversity, business innovation, creativity, enterprise development, knowledge management and risk management.
  • Organisational structures and culture
  • HRM in practice in organisations
  • HRM, HRD and organizational performance
  • Recruitment, selection and retention
  • Training and development
  • Performance Management and Rewards
  • Sustainability, ethics and CSR
  • The role of marketing within organisations and in relation to other business functions
  • The relationship between marketing activities and corporate aims, values and ethics
  • Models and importance of tactical marketing planning within the planning hierarchy
  • Use of primary and secondary information to conduct marketing audits and inform decisions.
  • Audit and analysis of the internal organisational and marketing environments
    • Audit and analysis of the micro, macro and global marketing environments
    • Use of audit findings within a SWOT/TOWS analysis to inform marketing decisions.
  • Investigation and analysis of market opportunities, characteristics and viability
  • Principles of supply and demand including: Economies of scale, elasticity, consumer demand, market types
  • Setting and monitoring marketing objectives for market awareness, growth, share and sales
  • Role and importance of corporate and product brands
  • The marketing mix including: 4Ps/4Cs:
    • Product (portfolio, new product development and innovation, quality systems)
    • Place and distribution (choice of channel: retail, e-tail, direct, multi-level channels; logistics)
    • Price (cost-plus vs market based pricing, 4Cs, price elasticity, contribution, break-even, pricing strategies and tactics)
    • Promotion (marcoms mix, selection, drip/burst, push/pull/profile strategies)
    • Services marketing (characteristics, 7Ps etc)
  • The marketing mix in practice (standard vs adapted/ differentiated, niche mixes etc)
  • Business-to-business marketing
  • Not-for-profit marketing
  • The Users of Financial Statements and the forms of business structures
  • The Companies Act 2006 and the role of the Financial Reporting Council and the Accounting Standards
    Board
  • Preparation of profit/revenue statements and balance sheets
    Sources and uses of funds in the context of different types of business organisation
  • Profit measurement and use of primary accounting ratios to measure profitability, performance, liquidity and solvency
  • Costs and costing, cost classification and cost behaviour;
  • Using marginal costing for decision making on maximising returns;
  • Using break-even analysis to evaluate business opportunities;
  • Using costs to price products and services and the effect of the market and price elasticity of demand on pricing decisions; and
  • Management of working capital.
  • Overview of various methodologies, and suitability for business type
  • Comparisons between different quantitative and qualitative modes of investigation and their usefulness in actual practice
  • Review of ethical, legal political and codes of conduct in the research process and business implications
  • Developing meaningful research questions/ questionnaire for competitive advantage
  • Using third party organisations for research
  • Research Presentation Skills for managers
  • Academic integrity / Values Industry Expectations
  • How to research and reference
  • Academic Writing: Descriptive, analytical, persuasive and critical styles
  • Development of an academic vocabulary
  • Structuring and planning for different types of assessements
  • Presentation skills for business students
  • Academic independence and self management
1 Compulsory Foreign Language Module Determined By The School
  • The four language skills will be continuously reinforced through extensive practice in oral activities, writing of basic informal communications and comprehension of key information from basic authentic written material and aural sources.
  • Using the recommended course book and supporting handouts, students will be taught to undertake practical communication tasks on a selected range of topics and situations such as: engaging in simple social exchanges and exchange pleasantries; introducing themselves and a third party; exchanging basic personal information ( age, nationality, studies, work and personal hobbies etc.); asking/telling the time; talking about weather ;ordering food in a restaurant; buying a travel ticket and getting around, participate in day-to-day routines, etc. Some of these situations will be applied to basic work-related scenarios.
  • The programme will also provide students with insights into the cultural background of the country such as: an overview of the current status of the language, geographical profile and cultural occurrences related to special events or occasions, traditions, family life and leisure activities.
  • The four language skills will be continuously reinforced through extensive practice in oral activities, writing of basic communications and comprehension of key information from basic authentic written material and aural sources.
  • Using the recommended course book and supporting handouts, students will be taught to undertake practical communication tasks on a selected range of topics and situations such as: engaging in basic social exchanges, exchanging personal information, giving and understanding directions, asking/telling the time, expressing likes and dislikes, shopping, ordering food and drink, making plans and arrangements, talking about future plans, recounting recent experiences and past events.
  • Work related tasks will include activities such as writing short basic business communication tasks; welcoming a visitor and exchanging pleasantries using appropriate register and cultural conventions; preparing an itinerary for a visitor; making travel arrangements for a business trip; making arrangements for a visit (hotel reservations, services required, catering requirements, etc. ); producing basic invitations for an event, etc.
  • The programme will also provide students with insights into the socio-cultural background of the country such as: an overview of the current status of the French language, geographical profile and cultural occurrences related to special events or occasions, traditions, family life, leisure activities, etc.
  • The four language skills will be continuously reinforced through extensive practice in oral activities, writing of basic communications and comprehension of key information from basic authentic written material and aural sources.
  • Using the recommended course book and supporting handouts, students will be taught to undertake practical communication tasks on a selected range of topics and situations such as: engaging in basic social exchanges, exchanging personal information, giving and understanding directions, asking/telling the time, expressing likes and dislikes, shopping, ordering food and drink, making plans and arrangements, talking about future plans, recounting recent experiences and past events.
  • Work related tasks will include activities such as writing short basic business communication tasks; welcoming a visitor and exchanging pleasantries using appropriate register and cultural conventions; preparing an itinerary for a visitor; making travel arrangements for a business trip; making arrangements for a visit (hotel reservations, services required, catering requirements, etc. ); producing basic invitations for an event, etc.
  • The programme will also provide students with insights into the socio-cultural background of the country such as: an overview of the current status of the French language, geographical profile and cultural occurrences related to special events or occasions, traditions, family life, leisure activities, etc.
Year 2

Students follow 90 credits of core modules and 30 credits of optional modules determined by the school.

Core Modules
  • To position Creativity and Innovation within the subject of Entrepreneurship.
  • Introduction to the key drivers for development within the Entrepreneurship.
  • Can regions reinvent themselves as Creative Economies?
  • The Entrepreneurial personality and effectiveness.
  • Hard and soft skills which can be used / developed to develop best practice in creativity and innovation.
  • Can the process of creativity and innovation be managed and measured?
  • How importance of identification of the financial imperatives.
  • Introduction to a range of problem solving techniques.
  • Intellectual property; considerations and funding opportunities.
  • Key drivers for the development of creative networks and teams.
  • Sustainability and social entrepreneurship.
  • Design imperatives for the entrepreneur.
  • The importance of mentoring to start-ups and growth of the business.
  • Introduction to the academic fields of Intercultural Studies, Cross-cultural studies and Communication Studies
  • Key principles and theories of Intercultural Studies and Sociolinguistics
  • The communication process: barriers to intercultural communication
  • Beyond linguistic barriers: the hidden dimensions of culture.
  • Cultural identity and diversity.
  • Cultural taxonomies: Adler, Schein, Kluckhohn & Strodtbeck , E.T Hall, Gumperz, Hofstede, Minkov, Trompenaars & Hampden-Turner, Bond, Schwartz
  • A critical approach to cultural taxonomies
  • Business etiquette and protocol: Do’s and Don’ts when conducting business in specific cultures/countries
  • Intercultural training: international mobility, culture shock, acculturation, international assignments
  • Management of expatriation and repatriation
  • Effective strategies for working in multicultural business environments
  • Intercultural analysis of given work related critical incidents and case studies
  •  
  • The global manager’s environment: assessing the political, economic, legal and technological environment.
  • Internationalisation of finance, human resource management and information systems.
  • Formulating and implementing strategy in SMEs; global alliances; emerging economy firms, etc.
  • Organization structure and control systems.
  • Financial considerations and priorities.
  • The impact of emerging economies on business and strategies for managing in emerging economies.
  • Management of interdependence: social corporate responsibility, ethics and sustainability.
  • The cultural context of global management: communicating across cultures ; cross-cultural negotiation, decision making and innovation.
  • The internationalisation of HRM: staffing, cross-cultural training and compensation for global operations.
  • The global leader: cross-cultural research on leadership and motivation.
  • Doing business in emerging economies.
  • Introduction to the nature and sources of international economic law and Globalisation
  • The concept of economic sovereignty, treaties and the relationship between national and economic law
  • International economic law and development including new economic order/ Washington consensus
  • The role of the United Nations economic agencies and bilateral aid agencies
  • Global financial regulation and international monetary law
  • International Monetary System (Bretton Woods System, IMF, World Bank)
  • Multilateral environmental regulation and their impact on international economic law and relations
  • Evaluation of the culture of the organisation
  • Negotiating tasks, duties and responsibilities within a working environment
  • Understanding the roles and duties of operative, supervisory and managerial staff
  • Observe and understand theoretical principles as applied in the workplace
  • Develop common, personal and social skills, and the understanding of ethical issues
  • Students are expected to perform routine work consistent with that which they aspire to on successful completion of their programme of study and to engage in a pre-defined work based project or research tailored to meet the needs of the organisation.
  • Research into potential career paths to evaluate requirements
  • Articulate evidence of current levels of skills, attributes, knowledge and work experience in a practice application (CV, Covering Letter and [short] Application form) for a specific graduate role
  • Verbal articulation, by means of a short presentation, of evidence of career path research, current strengths, development areas and plan for preparing for a graduate role
  • Develop the culture of the organisation
  • Negotiating tasks, duties and responsibilities within a working environment
  • Understanding the roles and duties of operative, supervisory and managerial staff
  • Understanding the relationship between theoretical studies and the world of work
  • Evaluate and understand the theoretical principles as applied in the workplace
  • Develop common, personal and social skills, and the understanding of ethical issues
  • Organisational structures, and operational policies and practices
  • Problem solving skills
  • Students are required to engage as part of a project team, who will work to develop a potential new retail business concept which will be confirmed through an individually written business plan.
  • Articulate evidence of current levels of skills, attributes, knowledge and work experience in a practice application (CV, covering letter and [short] Application form) for a specific graduate role.
  • Verbal articulation, by means of a short presentation, of evidence of career path research, current strengths, development areas and plan for preparing for a graduate role.
  • Introduction to operations management
  • Manufacturing operations and systems of production
  • Service operations
  • Operations management tools and techniques
  • Quality management
  • Quality tools and techniques
  • The value chain and value chain analysis
  • Supply chain development
  • Problem solving
  • Business operations improvement
  • Develop the culture of the organisation
  • Negotiating tasks, duties and responsibilities within a working environment
  • Understanding the roles and duties of operative, supervisory and managerial staff
  • Understanding the relationship between theoretical studies and the world of work
  • Evaluate and understand the theoretical principles as applied in the workplace
  • Develop common, personal and social skills, and the understanding of ethical issues
  • Organisational structures, and operational policies and practices
  • Problem solving skills
  • Students are required to engage as part of a project team, who will work to develop a potential new retail business concept which will be confirmed through an individually written business plan.
1 Compulsory Foreign Language Module Determined By The School
  • Using the recommended course book and supporting handouts /source material, the students will be taught to undertake practical communication tasks on a wide range of topics, language functions and situations such as: introducing people and socialising with people, expressing personal opinions; making travel arrangements; the weather; expressing intentions and plans; booking a hotel; talking about places and directions; describing places; presenting a company, city/region; making telephone calls, etc.
  • Work related tasks will include activities such as: introducing yourself and socialising with your client, talking about your company; preparing arrangements for a visit; setting up a business lunch; basic business telephone skills; basic business communication skills, etc.
  • The four language skills will be continuously reinforced through extensive practice in oral activities, writing of informal/formal communications and comprehension of information from a variety of authentic written material and aural sources.
  • The programme will also provide students with insights into the socio-cultural background of China. Students’ knowledge of contemporary life and socio-cultural issues will be furthered through exploration of topics such as travel, work and education, tourism, leisure activities and lifestyles.
  • Using the recommended course book and supporting handouts / source material, the students will be taught to undertake practical communication tasks on a wide range of topics and situations such as: discussing facilities and requirements, understanding instructions, reporting problems, seeking advice, offering recommendations, expressing personal opinions and discussion of topics of personal and cultural interest such as travel and leisure, work and education, etc.
  • Work related tasks will include activities such as: introducing a company and talking about products and/or services; preparing arrangements for a visit; writing a CV and applying for a job; business telephone skills; basic business writing skills, etc.
  • The four language skills will be continuously reinforced through extensive practice in oral activities, writing of informal/formal communications and comprehension of information from a variety of authentic written material and aural sources.
  • The programme will also provide students with insights into the socio-cultural background of the French speaking countries. Student knowledge of contemporary life and socio-cultural issues will be furthered through exploration of topics such as education, tourism, leisure activities and lifestyles.
  • Using the recommended course book and supporting handouts/source material, the students will be taught to undertake practical communication tasks on a wide range of topics and situations such as: discussing facilities and requirements, understanding instructions, reporting problems, seeking advice, offering recommendations, expressing personal opinions and discussion of topics of personal and cultural interest such as travel and leisure, work and education, etc.
  • Work related tasks will include activities such as: introducing a company and talking about products and/or services; preparing arrangements for a visit; writing a CV and applying for a job; business telephone skills; basic business writing skills, etc.
  • The four language skills will be continuously reinforced through extensive practice in oral activities, writing of informal/formal communications and comprehension of information from a variety of authentic written material and aural sources.
  • The programme will also provide students with insights into the socio-cultural background of the Spanish speaking countries. Student knowledge of contemporary life and socio-cultural issues will be furthered through exploration of topics such as education, tourism, leisure activities and lifestyles.
Optional Modules
  • Understanding the research process
  • Qualitative research methods and techniques
  • Quantitative research methods and techniques
  • The nature of political economy and its study
  • Economic and political theory: alternative explanations
  • National economies and political economy: similarities and differences
  • The world trading system: from free to fair
  • The international monetary system
  • The international financial system
  • The state and the multinational enterprise
  • Political economy and economic development around the world
  • Regionalism and regional integration
  • The nation state in an era of globalisation
  • Governance and the global economy
  • Contemporary, emerging and popular global issues
  • Planning and Budgeting and the behavioural implications
  • Budgetary Control, Fixed and Flexible budgets
  • Calculating forecasted future business plans
  • Assessment of Capital Investment decisions
  • The consumption process 1) Motivation, Values and Involvement
  • The consumption process 2) Consumer Perception Attitudes/Segmentation
  • The consumption process 3) Decision Making Consumer Learning and Memory
  • The individual consumer, involvement and satisfaction
  • Individual and consumption, the self-concepts; symbolic consumption, experiential consumption
  • Group consumption, the influence of reference groups and opinion forming
  • Consumption misbehaviour and rejecting the market
  • The ethical background to Consumption: Is consumerism right or wrong
  • Lifestyle, Culture, subculture community and meanings in the market place
  • The global consumer, ethnocentricity and polycentric views
  • Purchase Environment, servicescapes and how it/they influence consumers
  • Virtual Consumers: The virtual identity the virtual marketplace and the internet.
  • Definitions of Risk
  • Evaluation of Risk Perceptions – standard gamble / psychological factors
  • Managing risks – Avoidance – Opportunity aspects / Retain – passive, active/ Control/
    • Transfer– financial and/or non financial
  • Game theory v Prospect theory
  • Understanding the nature and role of money
  • Money , interest rates, inflation and exchange rates
  • The credit creation process
  • Economic and Legal factors affecting credit
  • International Financial Bodies
  • Major FI and markets , products and services
  • Major stakeholders in FI
  • Influences on the marketplace e.g. International aspects, ethical considerations
  • Role of central banks in national markets
  • Role of central banks internationally
  • Risks faced by FI – capital and commercial
  • Ethical issues in financial institutions and markets
  • International issues in financial regulation
  • Non western Banking institutions
  • External context: demographical, social, technological and environmental changes and the nature of work; globalisation and markets; international factors; UK/EU policy and legislation; stakeholders and customers;
  • Impact of external context on HRM in different types of organisations in the public, private and third sector;
  • Models, theories and concepts of HRM;
  • Role of HR: main functions and specialist areas of HR (e.g. people resourcing, employee relations; performance management and rewards; learning and development; organisational design and development); role of HR in management structure; role of HR in ethics, governance and accountability;
  • HR environmental planning and review: researching and analysing
  • HR and business data and presenting HR information and reports.
  • Being an entrepreneur. Key elements in successful small businesses.  Identifying new business ideas
  • Market research, using appropriate market intelligence reports such as Keynote, Mintel
  • Pricing techniques, media and advertising
  • Business Planning. Legal forms of business, financial planning
  • Sources of finance, legal considerations for the enterprise: Health and Safety, employers and employee legislation;
  • Costing the business start-up, budgeting, creating and manipulating excel spreadsheets
  • Report writing, working in groups
  • Introduction to operations management
  • Manufacturing operations and systems of production
  • Service operations
  • Operations management tools and techniques
  • Quality management, tools and techniques
  • Operational performance
  • The value chain and value chain analysis
  • Supply chain development
  • Problem solving
  • Business operations improvement
  • Infrastructure for e-business: Hardware and software.
  • Information and information seeking
  • Information seekers and seeking in electronic environments
  • Information-seeking knowledge, skills and attitudes.  Personal information infrastructures.
  • Web site design for the support of analytical search and browsing strategies
  • The Internet: law, privacy, trust and security including risk assessment and management, encryption, access control, digital signatures and certificates, SSL, SET, responsibilities and strategies.
  • Web site evaluation, flow, usability testing.  Online data and analytics.  The impacts on e-business strategy and tactics.
  • Website maintenance planning: the need for dynamic content updates, page optimisation, backups and disaster recovery, metatag and keyword development.

Year 3

Students follow 60 credits of core modules and 60 credits of optional modules determined by the school.

Core Modules
  • Stakeholder and Stockholder theories
  • Interdependence, social responsibility, ethics, sustainability
  • Cross-cultural differences in management
  • Techniques of strategic analysis and target-setting in an international context
  • Structural analysis of industries
  • Global environmental analysis
  • Strategic choice and implementation
  • Alternative models of decision-making – a critique of corporate planning and ‘good-
    practice’ models
  • Leadership and motivation
  • Staffing, training and compensation for global operations
  • Globalisation and cultural diversity: East West North and South
  • Cultural imperialism and ethnocentricity
  • The impact of culture (s) on business
  • The impact of business on cultures
  • Analysis of culturally related problems faced by business
  • Theoretical approaches to cultural differences
  • Effective strategies for the management of cultural differences
  • The module covers topic areas such as: international mobility and brain drain; internationalization of HRM; labour market trends; patterns of employment; unemployment;  flexible working practices; multiculturalism and globalisation; global citizenship; sustainable development; corporate social responsibility, etc, together with statistical evaluation of data presented in business reports and surveys. The module also covers international current affairs and topics related to the student areas of academic specialisation and professional interests. These areas are further explored by student individual presentations on self-selected socio-economic topics on current affairs worldwide.

Optional Modules

  • Introduction to classical and more recent theories of ethics including : virtue, utilitarianism, rights, justice post modern ethics and ethic of care
  • Introduction to social theory and political philosophy
  • Modern Business Ethics – contemporary and emerging issues in an historical perspective
  • Key ethical issues in the practice of national and international business including : consumer protection, fairness, diversity, rights and duties in the workplace, environmental sustainability, the market, new technology, corporate governance
  • Dilemmas and debates, their impact on contemporary business practice, including: responsible business versus corporate social responsibility, competition or cooperativism, and issues around the implementation of codes of ethics.
  • Marketing planning for international and global markets.
  • International and global marketing research.
  • The international and global business environment.
  • Analysis and decision making tools used in international and global marketing.
  • Market assessment and selection.
  • International and global marketing strategies.
  • International and global market entry methods.
  • International and global integrated marketing mix – from traditional to new age and the social media driven digital mix.
  • Adaption vs standardisation approaches.
  • World Bank, International Monetary Fund, World Trade Organisation as well as other data and sources eg Population Research Bureau, (PRB), Interbrand, UN.
  • Ethical, environmental issues and Corporate Social Responsibility
  • Contemporary cases and themes via cutting-edge case studies and “good practice examples”.
  • Dependent upon specific research topic.

Through a series of workshops and supervisor support students will engage with:

  • Completing a proposal enterprise brief that covers both scholarly and conventional research.
  • Primary and Secondary research, limitations and applications.
  • Data analysis
  • NPD/service development.
  • Applied market research.
  • Report writing
  • Oral presentation.
  • Definitions and development of the term Entrepreneurship.
  • The entrepreneurial spirit within an organisation – intrapreneurship.
  • Alternative forms of entrepreneurship; Social and civic entrepreneurship, open networks etc.
  • The Entrepreneur; Nature v Nurture
  • Gender, family and Entrepreneurship
  • The linkages between entrepreneurship and innovation
  • The competitive environment and innovation.
  • Learning organisations and the change to an innovation led organisation.
  • Action-based framework and perpetual innovation.
  • Technology, innovation and discontinuity.
  • Analysis of the key components of innovation; strategy, measurements, processes, people and technology.
  • Developing creativity; can it be managed?
  • Cultural dimensions of Innovation and Entrepreneurship.
  • Opportunity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship
  • Innovation, growth and the SME
  • Current issues in innovation research
  • Case study material from a number of guest speakers
  • State of the Planet
  • Sustainable development
  • Sustainability
  • The Natural Step
  • Voluntary Environmental Programmes, Eco Labels and Greenwash
  • Factors affecting Behavioural Change
  • Applied models of Behavioural Change
  • Education, Learning and Professional Practice
  • Capital Market and their problems
  • Approaches to risk measurement and analysis
  • Risk and reward models
  • Portfolio theory
  • Capital structure models
  • Fundamental Analysis of Investments
  • Technical Analysis of Investments
  • Investment valuation techniques
  • Measuring Investment portfolios
  • Design Investment portfolios
  • Analysing Investment portfolios
  • Foreign Currency as an Investment vehicle
  • Foreign exchange risk management
  • Alternative Investments
  • Comparison of theoretical models of HRM, management styles, policies and practices
  • National systems of employee relations, employee participation and involvement
  • National policies on recruitment and selection, training and development, reward and remuneration
  • Comparative analysis from a cultural and institutional perspective
  • The internationalisation of the firm, multinational strategy and structure
  • Recruitment, selection and development of international managers and cross-cultural awareness
  • Flexibility and changes to labour markets, managing diversity
  • The International Labour Organisation, the relationship between labour standards and globalisation
  • Globalisation, convergence-divergence theories, analysis of changing global context
  • Models of the project management process as reflections of broader methodology.
  • Sources of problems for the project team.
  • Estimation models and their respective strengths/weaknesses.
  • Aspects of motivational theory.
  • Analysis of “silver bullets” proposed for solutions to software crisis.
  • The software crisis and why projects fail: approaches towards solutions.
  • Rapid software prototyping classification, content, development, evaluation.
  • Strengths and weaknesses of prototyping.
  • Software re-use – justification, levels of abstraction, cognitive distance, approaches to re-use.
  • Object-oriented class library approach
  • Re-use in practice.
  • Software quality assurance – principles, measurement, strategic implications.
  • Business process re-engineering – rationale, role of information technology, role of human resources, management involvement, approaches to re-design.
  • Software metrics, justification and what/how to measure.
Admission Criteria

Age Requirement

At least 18 years old

Academic Requirement

  1. At least Grade C in any 3 GCE ‘A’ level subjects, or Polytechnic diploma, or equivalent foreign qualifications

English Entry Requirement

  1. Students whose first language is other than English will need to provide evidence of fluency to at least an IELTS 6.0 standard,

2. or the equivalent

Exemptions

Students with an appropriate polytechnic diploma or HND/C in the relevant discipline or equivalent can transfer directly onto the degree; other students wishing to enter the course may apply on the basis of RPL and RPEL for admission with Credit.  Such claims must conform to CARDIFF MET regulations for advanced standing and applicants must submit a portfolio of evidence.  This will be assessed by the programme team and a report sent for confirmation to the School.  The details required in this portfolio will depend upon the nature of the credit being claimed.

Key Facts
Accredited by: Cardiff Metropolitan University

Course Length:

36 Months (Full-Time & Part-Time)

Support for students and their learning:

  • All students studying in Beacon benefit from the team of dedicated tutors who provide a point of personal and regular contact for students
  • An induction programme both for first year students and direct entry year two or three students
  • Student handbook, programme handbook  and individual module handbooks
  • Module content and materials via  Moodle Virtual Learning Environment
  • Library and study skills packages
  • Library and learning resources of both Cardiff Metropolitan University and Beacon
  • 24 hour wifi, photocopying & printing services, library with PCs and laptop recommendation services
  • Unlimited worldwide web access
  • Access to student services including those offered by careers, welfare and counselling.

Teacher-Student Ratio

Beacon maintains a maximum teacher-student ratio as follows:

Tutorial – 1:40
Lecture – 1:72

About Cardiff Metropolitan University
  • Results of the latest Complete University Guide ranked Cardiff Met as the top post-1992 University and  2nd in UK’s hospitality studies’ research quality. Cardiff Met’s hospitality course is ranked 19th in UK
  • Ranked top in UK for overall international student support for the 6th time (International Student Barometer 2010-2015)
  • 95.6% of graduates secure employment or enter further study within six months of graduation. This is the highest figure of any modern university in Wales (DLHE 2015)

Find out more about Cardiff Metropolitan University: https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk